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Students Learn Rapid Transport Skills during Medevac Helicopter Visit

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583f1ff38a5c9 Morning Fire Science and EMT classes with the Life Flight helicopter

Morning Fire Science and EMT classes with the Life Flight helicopter

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583f1ff38a5c9 Students get an opportunity to go inside.

Students get an opportunity to go inside.

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583f1ff38a5c9 Chief Jason “Jake” Pruski (Fire Science Instructor) and Captain Sarah Speerly (EMT Instructor).

Chief Jason “Jake” Pruski (Fire Science Instructor) and Captain Sarah Speerly (EMT Instructor).

This past week the Fire Science and EMT students had the opportunity to watch a medical evacuation (Medevac) helicopter land in the IVVC parking lot. Students got to sit in the helicopter, take pictures, and ask questions.

Because both classes are part of the Emergency Medical Service team, they need to know the skills and training it takes to get a patient loaded into the Medevac helicopters. EMS providers will have multiple encounters with Medevac helicopters in their career. It is important that they know the correct protocol to ensure patient and provider safety. In addition to this the students also learned why Medevac helicopters would be called to an emergency and how to respond to one.

In Illinois, there are 3 different levels of trauma centers. Trauma is defined as a deeply distressing or disturbing experience or physical injury. There are many different manners by which one could be traumatized, whether that is by means of a car accident, fire, or heart or brain problems. Thankfully, the EMS world has been equipped with helicopters that can reach further areas faster than an ambulance because there is no traffic in the air.

Life Flight is a Medevac helicopter provider. To give you an idea of the inside of a Life Flight helicopter, imagine the back of an ambulance and pack everything you see into your car. That is roughly the amount of space that the medics have to work in these aircraft. I personally imagine that you wouldn’t want to be very tall and work in such an environment.

As the students hone in their skills, they will be able to better grasp the concept of rapid transport and how critical it is that the fire and EMS workers get the victim(s) out of harm’s way as fast as possible. Throughout the duration of the school year, the EMT and Fire Science students will have more opportunities to work together and hone in their collaborative and respective skills.

Later on in the year, they will be able to do so when they are involved in SkillsUSA competitions. For more information on SkillsUSA, go to www.skillsusa.org.

 

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